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20120901
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
change in the united states and how it's been shifted pretty rapidly over time as the great state of nevada. obama is running ahead of though not nearly as far as he did in 2008. but it still will cut off on my monitor but you can see an incredible increase of nine percentage points for the share of eligible voters who are minorities according to the data between 2008 and 2012. that's a massive demographic tide against the republicans and you can see there's been a decline of five percentage points in the share of voters that are colleges john became group into bills and eight. that is a very quick run through some of the swing states in the 2008 election. maybe it's time for me to step back, catch my breath and just say why is this. why is this going on? why does obama have the lead he does? why is from the having difficulty, and what many people argue should be the core limping along economy and a president that has done so much as the defense and its face it popular at the beginning like the health care reform act and so long, the stimulus looked upon unfavorably by a lot of vo
enormous pleasure to welcome to the podium united states secretary of education arne duncan. [applause] [applause] >> thank you so much for that kind introduction. you don't want me in the treasury. i'm going keep the remarks brief. i would love to have a conversation with you. i'm thrilled to get in the focus on education. it's important for the country to be engaging in. a lot of challenges and hard work ahead of us. with i think we have a chance to breakthrough in fundamental way. i'll give you a snapshot where we think we are, where we're trying to go and the next stipes. a couple of numbers haunt me. 25% dropout rate in the country. that's a million of kids leaving our schools. no good jobs out there for them. and many of the african and latino that 40, 50, 60%. we are devastating entire communities unless we [inaudible] we used to lead the world in college graduate. today we are 1 4th. we wonder why we are struggling economically. i continue to think about the skill set in a time of employment rates we have as much as 2 million high wage high skills jobs that we can't fill. i thi
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these and in fact i found one but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had of course their roles in private life but it is in the nature of private life it usually doesn't survive in the historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondence save your letters that you write to them and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? well, maybe, and if they do you will become, can i use my words adviseably, here, you will become literally immortal. you will become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters. they will say ah, that is what life was like at the beginning of the
that threatens the very viability of the united states senate. last july the obama administration used the flimsiest of arguments, granted themselves the authority to waive federal welfare work requirements. and whether or not what they, the obama administration intends to accomplish with these waivers is good welfare policy has been the subject of robust debate. i'm not here to argue the merits or lack thereof of the underlying welfare policy goals of the obama administration. what i am here to do is to make a plea to my fellow senators, as senators we simply cannot let this action stand. if we fail to stand together as senators in defense of our constitutional duty to be the ones to draft legislation, we might as well pack up our bags and go home, because we will have opened the door for this administration and future administrations to unilaterally decide they can waive precedent, congressional intent, and actual legislative language as senators have scrupulously debated and compromised on. if we do not stand together as the united states senate, we will be ceding our authority to t
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
of nuclear missiles, getting way ahead of the united states in defense and wait it was so dangerous that we might lose the cold war. kennedy said that over and over again. to some extent, one of the reasons that he won the election in 1960. he gets into office and has access to intelligence and realizes that actually soviets are way behind, extremely behind. there is a missile gap in the united states. the problem was that kennedy in the campaign, they said that we need hugely increased defense in order to make up for it and he was committed to that. the result was in 1961 at that time, the largest defense bill in human history, and it was to a great extent that it made -- needless to say, the missiles could have caused a lot of destruction. >> host: wended nikita khrushchev come on the scene? >> guest: it did take some people to the blog, but not nikita khrushchev. there were two leaders who were essentially a joint leadership. by 19541956, khrushchev was a supreme leader. >> host: what policy changes came with his ascension? >> guest: khrushchev would've been shocking to anyone in the wes
be defunded. and by that time the largest affiliate in the united states was city year. the governor of massachusetts, mitt romney, was on the board. and then send me a letter saying, michael brown is nodding his head, sent me a letter saying, with 49 other, 40 other governors, we should continue this. this is important. so i called him and i was out of the white house and i said governor, i love city year. that's what americorps is all about. i hope you'll help me save it. and he urged the republican congress to continue to support city year, and he urged the white house to do it. and they did. i just visited a city year program in south africa, johannesburg, where the youth unemployment rate exceeds 40%, but 80% of the city year volunteers in johannesburg had a job that day they leave city year. so it turns out to be good economics as well as good for the society. all of you should know that, and i wanted you to know what. and, governor, i thank you for being here. the podium is yours. [applause] >> thank you, mr. president. it's an honor to be here this morning. and i appreciate y
of the united states or how inspired they are by the people of the united states, because i think that we have all seen people and may be blessed that walter cronkite and all the rest. they saw americans at their absolute best. yes, ma'am. of curious and these stories were quite extraordinary. has there been a similar book on reporters like bob who cover the pacific like you have on this story? >> knollwood there is a diet that i know that is thinking about doing the book. [laughter] will you buy it if i do it? >> it's a fascinating story in itself. >> the pacific war i think too often gets overlooked especially the journalism and all the rest were phenomenal reporters covering the pacific i still love homer. how did you get into doing at. tell us a little bit of the book. >> my buddies at georgetown university, for history buffs and world war ii devotees when mr. cronkite passed away i was struck by two things. one is instead of the usual jd e-mails that we exchange when people leave us it is pure reference that was the death of the response. then i was struck when few of the ovaries mentione
important innovation in public education over the past generation in the united states. there are many myths and many misconceptions about charters and about the motivations and goals of many in the charter movement. you saw some of that play out in the chicago teachers strike. beyond that there are many people in the united states who think charters are an unmitigated good or alternatively an existential threat. the reality is they are neither of those. we are exceedingly fortunate to have roland prior with us today. i will introduce roland before i introduce the rest of the panel after he finishes. the project has done considerable work with roland. we are fortunate to have been able to do that. he has prepared an extraordinary paper which he is going to summarize. i would say roland's resume is a little hard to read. you would think it must be fake or something. how could anybody have done so much so quickly? i particularly want to know what a titanium lion is but i won't blanc that year. he is doing extraordinarily important and vital and groundbreaking work. if we are going to ever turn
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)